The Benefits of Piano Lessons for Young Children

Piano

Our 4-year-old son is now five months into the ten month Yamaha Music Canada School piano program at the Tom Lee Music Learning Centre in downtown Vancouver. We’ve had a chance to follow his progress from day one and we are also learning about the benefits of taking piano lessons at such a young age. Some of the main benefits include:

  • Piano Lessons Help Raise Self Esteem and Patience

Learning to play a new instrument takes a lot of dedication, many hours of practice and lots of patience.  I have seen how our son has faced challenges and has kept a positive outlook while working hard to practice and master new skills.

He has also been learning about patience and taking the time to work towards an ultimate goal.

  • Piano Lessons Help Increase Coordination

Playing the piano requires both hands to work independently of each other and it helps develop eye-hand coordination. I have noticed my son’s coordination has improved greatly since the beginning of his piano lessons, and improving his fine motor skills will help his overall dexterity and coordination.

  • Piano Lessons Help Children Learn to Concentrate Better

This is a skill  that we are still working on and it is critical when learning to play the piano. Sitting for long periods of time and working on reading and playing music requires concentration.

Younger children usually have more difficulty with concentration, but persevering and working with them to concentrate for short practice sessions and piano lessons is a great way to help them develop this skill.  I started scheduling very short sessions and I noticed his concentration and attention span have increased dramatically over the last few months, as a result we can now do longer practice sessions.

  • Piano Lessons Help Boost Academic Skills

Music and math are highly intertwined. By understanding and learning about beat, rhythm, and scales, children are learning how to divide, work with fractions, and recognize patterns. Many studies available show children who play an instrument, score higher on both standard and spatial cognitive development tests alike. There are also findings that show kids who play piano, in particular, scored higher in math, especially on problems dealing with ratios and creating fractions. It seems that music wires a child’s brain to help him better understand other areas of math.

Stay tuned for our next update in March as our son continues his piano lessons!

And don’t forget about the Yamaha Education Growth Initiative (available until Feb 28th!)

The Yamaha Education Growth Initiative (EGI) is a rebate that works as a credit towards music lessons with the Yamaha Music Education System When you purchase a new Yamaha product from now until February 28, 2015, you qualify for a lesson tuition credit towards the Yamaha Music Education System group lessons. For example, if you were to buy a brand new Yamaha Grand Piano, you would get $500 to put towards group lessons with the Yamaha Music Education System.

There are a variety of instruments that apply, including drums, guitars, brass and wodwinds, each with their own level of rebate. I love how they are helping make lessons attainable for more families! Find more details and their full brochure HERE.

Disclosure – I am participating in the Yamaha Music Canada Brand Ambassador program on behalf with Mom Central Canada. I received compensation as a thank you for participating and for sharing my honest opinion. The opinions on this blog are my own.

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Angela V

Founder and Writer at One Smiley Monkey blog
Hi, my name is Angela and I am a Canadian mom living in Vancouver with my wonderful husband and two happy little boys. I am the founder and primary contributor behind One Smiley Monkey. Welcome to my blog!
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15 responses to “The Benefits of Piano Lessons for Young Children”

  1. loriag — February 18, 2015 @ 5:02 am (#)

    So many benefits, I saw them in my children.

    Reply

  2. Laurie P — February 18, 2015 @ 6:32 am (#)

    EGI sounds like a great program!

    Reply

  3. Victoria Ess — February 18, 2015 @ 6:35 am (#)

    My parents put us through piano and I would definitely do the same with my kids.

    Reply

  4. kathy downey — February 18, 2015 @ 8:34 am (#)

    So many benefits,I wish I had learned to play

    Reply

  5. Jenn Erin — February 18, 2015 @ 3:25 pm (#)

    These are really great benefits. I really wished I had the opportunity to learn when I was younger!

    Reply

  6. Elizabeth Matthiesen — February 18, 2015 @ 7:40 pm (#)

    I’m afraid that I don’t have an ear for music at all. My children always despair of me. I’m glad your son is enjoying himself. 🙂

    Reply

  7. Melinda — February 19, 2015 @ 11:28 am (#)

    I really enjoyed taking piano lessons as a kid, it’s amazing what music can do!

    Reply

  8. Stephanie LaPlante — February 20, 2015 @ 7:39 am (#)

    I believe all those benefits are true. I wish I took piano as a child.

    Reply

  9. Elva Roberts — February 21, 2015 @ 3:26 pm (#)

    I applaud you for your patience and persistence in helping your child as he learns to play the piano. I have heard doctors and neurologists say that learning to play a musical instrument or learning a new language does make new pathways in the brain and does help to prevent dementia as we age.
    I know that many of my grandchildren took piano lessons and it certainly helped them in their social life. Go to a party and if there is a piano there, guess who gets to entertain! Kudos to your and One Smiley Monkey.

    Reply

  10. kathy downey — February 23, 2015 @ 5:45 am (#)

    Learning to play a musical instrument is something I have always wanted to do

    Reply

  11. Laurie P — February 24, 2015 @ 5:16 am (#)

    Kinda wish I was back in the city, where music lessons were easily available…..not much going on in this tiny town!

    Reply

  12. heidi c. — February 24, 2015 @ 7:24 pm (#)

    I started my kids very early in music and find they have a great ear for it now as a result.

    Reply

  13. kathy downey — February 27, 2015 @ 6:19 am (#)

    My niece has 3 girls 5/7/10 who play piano and do voice twice and they just love it.

    Reply

  14. Kael Drake — December 1, 2015 @ 11:12 am (#)

    As a pianist from a young age, I can attest to the truthfulness of your post. I started taking piano around the age of six, and as a result, I was able to concentrate and learn better in school, like you mentioned. The benefits of piano lessons are many, and I am extremely grateful that my parents took the time and money to have me taught! For parents that are thinking about putting their children in piano lessons, I would suggest that you do so around the age of five, so that the child can really appreciate what they are doing. Thank you for posting!

    Reply

  15. Rachel Lannister — June 13, 2017 @ 10:25 am (#)

    In the article you talked about how piano lessons can actually help improve children’s academic skills, specifically with math. I’ve been wanting to sign my son up for something, as I want him to develop a talent he can have for the rest of his life. I know that I struggled with math in school, so getting my son a boost like this would be perfect.

    Reply

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